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Maybe an insurrection is what we needed. 

No, I'm not at all condoning what happened Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol, and I cringe every time news outlets dive deeper into the violence that ensued that day. 

I've heard a lot of chatter about what it will take to bring our nation back together after such disunion with a pandemic falling on an election year. 

The year 2020 started out boisterous and hopeful. Then in March it crashed and, for a short moment in our history, the world came together to console and encourage one another. John Krasinski incited virtual joy through "Some Good News," and many spun his optimism off on their own shows and celebrations of humans surviving, thriving and seeking normalcy amid the upset. 

People spoke of the unity felt and found following the tragic Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Granted, those attacks were foreign invaders on our soil. Still, global citizens came together, processing the situation as it rolled through our news feeds.

Then masks became a thing. And people claiming their rights were taken away and the world would come crashing down because saving one life by wearing a mask was too much for the bubbling mob that would ensue. 

The events on Jan. 6 were also a terrorist attack. The definition of insurrection come to life before our eyes. This time, though, the attack was not from enemy lines. It was by our own people on our own people. 

When consuming as much as I could handle of the U.S. Senate speeches as they reconvened on the evening of Jan. 6, I saw a slight glimmer of the unity we saw following Sept. 11, 2001, and at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Both sides of the aisle, possibly for the first time in the last four years, came together to condemn violence, hatred and terrorism. Similar speeches went back and forth from Republican to Democrat, each saying differing versions of the same speech condemning the violence and begging for movement forward. 

While outside of that tender moment televised across the nation rage continues and plans for more attacks boil, there was a slight change in perspective for some. Opponents came together to fight back against the bigger issues for a short while. 

I hope next time our nation finds itself divided, it won't take a rogue president and the textbook example of insurrection to unite us together as the United States of America. 

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before moving into the managing editor position in November 2018. She is a native of Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles. 

Managing editor

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before moving into the managing editor position in November 2018. She is a native of Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles.

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